thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?August 25, 2014
Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.
He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.
And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:
I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.
I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:
I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.
But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.
"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.
"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"
Her voice trailed off.
Angry?
She nodded.
"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."
The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.
But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.
Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.
"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."
We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.
"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."
What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?
"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."
The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.
"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."
He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.
"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.
"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"
Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.
Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.
"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

In the alley, on hot, rainy afternoon, three men sweated through their suits. They weren’t politicians or cable TV screamers. They were detectives working a heater case.

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.
I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?
Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.
"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."
Source
Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?
August 25, 2014

Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.

He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.

And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:

I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.

I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:

I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.

But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.

"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.

"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"

Her voice trailed off.

Angry?

She nodded.

"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."

The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.

But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.

Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.

"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."

We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.

"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."

What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?

"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."

The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.

"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."

He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.

"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.

"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"

Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.

Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.

"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.

I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?

Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.

"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."

Source

Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

16,211 notes

prettyboyshyflizzy:

beystopher:

hoebutmadefashion:

airrogance:

iamweiner:

thighclapper:

vijara:

RIP to the thousands of turkeys being slaughtered in the name of “giving thanks” and “peace on earth”.

And RIP to all the Native Americans who are completely forgotten/have their genocide glamorized and covered up by this holiday

RIP to my asshole after all the food is done being digested

RIP to my bussy after getting pounded by my cousin in the bathroom after thanksgiving dinner

image

0-100 nigga real quick

147,791 notes

kimkanyekimye:

Kim taking pictures with fans out in Calabasas, CA 8/28/14

kimkanyekimye:

Kim taking pictures with fans out in Calabasas, CA 8/28/14

17 notes

j5h:

j5h:

my dick is itchy I think i have herpes

image

image

(Source: j6)

219,210 notes

postmarq:

College Packing Index Cards:
Use these index cards as a college packing guide — you don’t have to bring everything on the list.

12,388 notes

tommyxpickles:

whitepaperlyrics:

your-daisyfreshgirl:

When did he stop treating you like a princess?
Domestic violence and abuse can happen to anyone, but the vast majority of victims are young girls and women simply because they are “the weaker sex”.
Did you know:
On average, 2 women a week are killed by a current or former male partner. This constitutes nearly 40% of all female homicide victims.
45% of women are abused/raped by current husbands or partners, 9% by former partners, and a further 29% of perpetrators were otherwise known to the victim. Only 17% are attacked by by strangers.
44% of victims of domestic violence are involved in more than one incident. A large number of women experience the same abuse every week.
On average, a woman is assaulted 35 times before her first call to the police.
30% of domestic violence either starts or will intensify during pregnancy.
In almost 75% of incidents, a child is present or in a room closeby.
THIS HAS GOT TO STOP. IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE THIS WAY.
It’s time to show the world that we are not weak and we will simply not stand for this kind of ill treatment. Women should be treated as princesses, like Ariel and Cinderella, who never have to live in fear of their so-called Prince Charming.
It’s time to stand up. To speak out. To be heard.
Women’s domestic abuse/violence helplines (worlwide):
UK
Women’s Aid/National Domestic Violence Helpline: 0808 2000 247
EB Women’s Aid: 0800 0852 654
Refuge: 020 7395 7713
Wales Domestic Abuse Helpline: 0808 80 10 800
Women’s Aid Federation (Northern Ireland): 0800 917 1414
National Centre for Domestic Violence: 0844 8044 999
WDA Helpline: 0161 636 7525
Rape Crisis support: 0808 802 9999
Relate: 0300 100 1234
Kiran Asian women’s aid: 020 8558 1986
Independent Choices: 0161 636 7525
USA
The National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-7233 or 1-800-787-3224
DAHMW: 1-888-743-5754
Safe Horizon for DA/V: 800.621.HOPE (4673)
Safe Horizon for Rape: 212.227.3000
Love Is Respect: 1-866-331-9474
National Teen Dating abuse/violence: 866-331-9474 or 866-331-8453
RAINN (Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network): 1-800-656-4673
AUSTRALIA
White Ribbon: 02 9045 8444
National Sexual Assault/Family/Domestic hotline: 1800 737 732
LifeLine: 13 11 14
The Women’s Domestic Violence Crisis Service: (03) 9322 3555 or STD Freecall 1800 015 188
Sexual Assault Crisis Line: 1800 806 292
Domestic Violence Victoria, AUS: 9921 0828
DVConnect Womensline - Queensland: 1800 811 811
OTHER/MORE - some repeats:
National Child Abuse Helpline: 1-800-422-4453
National Domestic Violence Crisis Line: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
National Domestic Violence Hotline (TDD): 1-800-787-32324
Center for the Prevention of School Violence: 1-800-299-6504
Child Abuse Helpline: 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453)
Domestic Violence Helpline: 1-800-548-2722
Healing Woman Foundation (Abuse): 1-800-477-4111
Child Abuse Hotline Support & Information: 1-800-792-5200
Women’s Aid National Domestic Violence Helpline: (UK Only) 0345 023 468
Sexual Abuse Centre: (UK Only) 0117 935 1707
Sexual Assault Support (24/7, English & Spanish): 1-800-223-5001
Domestic & Teen Dating Violence (English & Spanish): 1-800-992-2600
Relationships Australia: 1300-364-277
Criminal Law Advice Line: 020 7251 8887  
Let’s put a stop to women’s domestic violence and abuse - FULL STOP.
If you’re being treated in a way you know isn’t right, pick up the phone and get help. And get out. IT IS NEVER TOO LATE FOR YOUR HAPPILY EVER AFTER. IT’S TIME TO CHANGE.
If in need of immediate help from abuse/violence, call the police (999/911 etc).
We’re in this together.
~
"When did he stop treating you like a princess?"/It doesn’t have to be this way - DISCLAIMER: I do not own these images. Courtesy of Saint Hoax.
FIND OUT MORE HERE.
~
REBLOG AND SPREAD THE WORD. NOW.

GET REBLOGGING PEOPLE.

please please reblog this.

tommyxpickles:

whitepaperlyrics:

your-daisyfreshgirl:

When did he stop treating you like a princess?

Domestic violence and abuse can happen to anyone, but the vast majority of victims are young girls and women simply because they are “the weaker sex”.

Did you know:

  • On average, 2 women a week are killed by a current or former male partner. This constitutes nearly 40% of all female homicide victims.
  • 45% of women are abused/raped by current husbands or partners, 9% by former partners, and a further 29% of perpetrators were otherwise known to the victim. Only 17% are attacked by by strangers.
  • 44% of victims of domestic violence are involved in more than one incident. A large number of women experience the same abuse every week.
  • On average, a woman is assaulted 35 times before her first call to the police.
  • 30% of domestic violence either starts or will intensify during pregnancy.
  • In almost 75% of incidents, a child is present or in a room closeby.

THIS HAS GOT TO STOP. IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE THIS WAY.

It’s time to show the world that we are not weak and we will simply not stand for this kind of ill treatment. Women should be treated as princesses, like Ariel and Cinderella, who never have to live in fear of their so-called Prince Charming.

It’s time to stand up. To speak out. To be heard.

Women’s domestic abuse/violence helplines (worlwide):

UK

  • Women’s Aid/National Domestic Violence Helpline: 0808 2000 247
  • EB Women’s Aid: 0800 0852 654
  • Refuge: 020 7395 7713
  • Wales Domestic Abuse Helpline: 0808 80 10 800
  • Women’s Aid Federation (Northern Ireland): 0800 917 1414
  • National Centre for Domestic Violence: 0844 8044 999
  • WDA Helpline: 0161 636 7525
  • Rape Crisis support: 0808 802 9999
  • Relate: 0300 100 1234
  • Kiran Asian women’s aid: 020 8558 1986
  • Independent Choices: 0161 636 7525

USA

  • The National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-7233 or 1-800-787-3224
  • DAHMW: 1-888-743-5754
  • Safe Horizon for DA/V: 800.621.HOPE (4673)
  • Safe Horizon for Rape: 212.227.3000
  • Love Is Respect: 1-866-331-9474
  • National Teen Dating abuse/violence:
    866-331-9474 or 866-331-8453
  • RAINN (Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network): 1-800-656-4673

AUSTRALIA

  • White Ribbon: 02 9045 8444
  • National Sexual Assault/Family/Domestic hotline: 1800 737 732
  • LifeLine: 13 11 14
  • The Women’s Domestic Violence Crisis Service:
    (03) 9322 3555 or STD Freecall 1800 015 188
  • Sexual Assault Crisis Line: 1800 806 292
  • Domestic Violence Victoria, AUS: 9921 0828
  • DVConnect Womensline - Queensland: 1800 811 811

OTHER/MORE - some repeats:

  • National Child Abuse Helpline: 1-800-422-4453
  • National Domestic Violence Crisis Line: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233)
  • National Domestic Violence Hotline (TDD): 1-800-787-32324
  • Center for the Prevention of School Violence: 1-800-299-6504
  • Child Abuse Helpline: 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453)
  • Domestic Violence Helpline: 1-800-548-2722
  • Healing Woman Foundation (Abuse): 1-800-477-4111
  • Child Abuse Hotline Support & Information: 1-800-792-5200
  • Women’s Aid National Domestic Violence Helpline: (UK Only) 0345 023 468
  • Sexual Abuse Centre: (UK Only) 0117 935 1707
  • Sexual Assault Support (24/7, English & Spanish): 1-800-223-5001
  • Domestic & Teen Dating Violence (English & Spanish): 1-800-992-2600
  • Relationships Australia: 1300-364-277
  • Criminal Law Advice Line: 020 7251 8887 

Let’s put a stop to women’s domestic violence and abuse - FULL STOP.

If you’re being treated in a way you know isn’t right, pick up the phone and get help. And get out. IT IS NEVER TOO LATE FOR YOUR HAPPILY EVER AFTER. IT’S TIME TO CHANGE.

If in need of immediate help from abuse/violence, call the police (999/911 etc).

We’re in this together.

~

"When did he stop treating you like a princess?"/It doesn’t have to be this way - DISCLAIMER: I do not own these images. Courtesy of Saint Hoax.

FIND OUT MORE HERE.

~

REBLOG AND SPREAD THE WORD. NOW.

GET REBLOGGING PEOPLE.

please please reblog this.

(Source: the-taintedtruth)

90,620 notes

thecutestofthecute:

Because Pitbulls need love too.

141,420 notes